Obama Closer To Winning Democratic Nomination; Clinton Holds On To Fight


Barack Obama has moved closer to being the democratic nominee for President with more delegates, while Hillary Clinton who hasn’t given up the fight is expected to indicate she would accept an offer as Obama’s running mate for Vice President.

In a race for what is now a goal of 2118 delegates since the addition of more primaries’ delegates, Barack Obama is even closer to what seems to be a victory in the Democratic party. The two Democratic presidential primaries will end Tuesday night in Montana and South Dakota with Barack Obama only a few delegates short with a current count of 2076 delegates under his belt, while Clinton follows with 1917 delegates.

Though at first there were no signs of either delegate possibly committing to accepting nomination for Vice President, reportedly Clinton is expected to deliver a message that she will do whatever it takes to put a Democrat in the White House — a possible message indicating that she will accept an offer to be Obama’s running mate.

“In her speech… she will convey the message that first and foremost she is committed to Democrats winning in November and will do whatever she’s asked to do,” said a close friend and adviser of the New York senator and former first lady, according to CNN.

At a town hall meeting on Monday in Troy, Michigan, Barack Obama stated, “… Senator Clinton has run an outstanding race, she is an outstanding public servant, and she and I will be working together in November.” Since he did not state in detail the meaning of “working together,” there is much curiosity as to whether Obama would choose Clinton to be his vice presidential running mate. Furthermore both candidates have said before that it’s too early to discuss vice presidency.

Former Iowa governor and a co-chairman of Clinton’s campaign, Tom Vilsack, has said Clinton “needs to acknowledge that Obama is going to be the nominee and quickly get behind him” after Tuesday’s races.

Yet still, Clinton at her victory speech on Sunday, pointed out that she is winning the popular vote and seems to be determined to fight to the very end.

Meanwhile, confident of a victory, Obama plans to mark the end of the long primary campaign with a rally while focusing on the general election in St. Paul, Minn. at this year’s Republican National Convention.

However, even after a Democratic victory, the presidential race is still far from over, as the winning party, will then face Republican John McCain in November’s presidential election.

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